4 Types of Sinking Tropical Fish Food

Fish flakes are one of the most widely available pet store foods. They float at the surface to feed top-dwelling species, then slowly sink as food for midwater and bottom dwellers. Packed full of vitamins and nutrients that keep fish healthy and vibrant.

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Granules are another versatile type of food available to purchase for various kinds of fish diets, whether floating or sinking species. Some granules are tailored specifically for bottom feeders such as neon tetras that tend to remain lower in their environment.

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Pellets

Pellets are compressed blends of fish food ingredients that have been formed into round shapes for easier consumption by fish. Their higher density than water allows them to sink quickly; typically made of fishmeal or protein-and-oil mixture.

Pellet fish food comes in both floating and slow-sinking pellet varieties and tends to be slightly cheaper than its flake counterpart. Plus, pellet fish feed has a longer shelf life and makes estimating how many fish your tank requires easier.

Wood pellet fuel is produced using byproducts from lumber milling, furniture manufacturing, construction and agriculture industries. Raw materials used include sawdust, sawchips, shavings, bark and crop straw as well as residual forest products that produce cleaner, hotter and longer burning biomass energy than traditional firewood while simultaneously serving as an atmospheric greenhouse gas-reducer.

Granules

Granulation is a mechanical process used to change the physical properties of raw material powder or blends, including flow characteristics, density, particle size and particle size distribution. Granulation can either be performed wet or dry.

Wet granulation involves immersing plastic materials in liquid before passing them through a granulator to form granules. Dry granulation involves compressing powdered plastic under high pressure or mixing powdered materials with specific substances, producing the desired outcome.

Granules are clusters of grainy matter found within certain cells, such as granulocytes and mast cells, that contain and store biologically active substances that will be released when degranulation takes place. Also referred to as dense bodies, mitochondrial clouds, cytoplasmic nuclei, Balbiani bodies, germinal granules in Xenopus laevis embryos or chromatoid bodies.

Wafers & Sticks

Wafers are thin cakes or cookies with intricate stamping or molds for Twelfth Night/Day dishes, often filled with designs for festive celebrations or used as Twelfth Day snacks. Wafers may be sweet or savory.

Wafer cookies were first recorded as being available for sale in Paris streets during the 14th century, and Renaissance cook books featured recipes for them. One such Renaissance recipe can be found in The New Family Receipt Book from 1811; its list of ingredients looks similar to kitchen-sink wafer production: flour, water, sugar and colored paste made up of various toxic “mineral colors,” including vermilion and mercury sulfide that gave sealing wax its orangey scarlet hues.

Mercury should always be treated as toxic waste and must be handled accordingly. To do so, work in an area with adequate ventilation.

Gel Food

Repashy offers various varieties of gel food designed to sink and remain at the bottom of tanks when introduced into them, specifically catering for community fish such as goldfish, aufwuchs grazers, and bottom feeders as well as omnivorous species like otocinclus and plecos.

Making homemade putty is simple: boil water, add powder and let set at room temperature or immediately pour it into a mold for faster results. Sliced into cubes for use later or stored refrigerated or sealed frozen for later use, it makes an excellent edible snack or decoration!

Add powdered astaxanthin for red color if desired for optimal results, ensuring its safety for fish while not altering its taste in any way. Other optional ingredients can include paprika, green vegetables or natural dyes to give food that extra pop of color.